About Us

Ehrman are famous for their superior-quality needlepoint kits, which are in demand all over the world.  Recognized as the most imaginative and stylish around, Ehrman needlepoint is commissioned from leading textile designers, the most famous of whom is probably Kaffe Fassett. 


For over 30 years Ehrman has pioneered this field of design and has gathered together a group of stitchers who between them have revolutionised the craft.  Our designers continue to set the pace.


About the Kits

The needlepoint kits come complete with a printed colour canvas, needle, instruction booklet and all the 100% pure new wool clearly identified by colour.  The number of holes to the inch on the printed canvas are listed by each design along with measurements of the image size. 

Some of the kits are printed on 7 or 8 holes to the inch canvas with the yarn used double.  To cover this wider gauge canvas properly you will need to thread your needle with 2 strands of wool instead of 1 and work in exactly the same way.  This is a favourite technique of Kaffe Fassett’s and it has the advantage of speed, with fewer holes to the inch, the design grows quickly.

The wool is packed in “bundles” which makes it easier to identify the different shades.  This is particularly important when colours are close.  The recipes for the wool quantities are calculated by computer for greater accuracy. This is the best news of all as there is nothing more frustrating than running our of a particular shade right at the end.

 

The Production of the Kits

The Wool

The wools in all Ehrman needlepoint kits are 100% pure new wool.  350 shades are involved some of which are very close.  These are  wound onto cones for delivery to our warehouse in Yorkshire.  There they are stored and sorted ready for chopping into the requisite lengths for packing into the various kits.

The Canvases

The canvases are 100% cotton and are printed in England, in the west country.  This is another manufacturing process requiring close attention to detail.  Each square on the canvas has to be graphed in the correct colour so that when the machine prints the canvas it is clear which stitch goes where. 

Printing on canvas is difficult as it moves (unlike paper) and as the colour is only printed on the outer edge of each square it is almost like printing on air.  It is a demanding process and our printers are as much craftsmen as manufacturers.